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If you’re a huge indie-pop fan like us, might we recommend an artist named KRNA? Search for their single entitled “And Ever” on Spotify, press play, and you’re welcome, you’re going to lose yourself in that single moment. One thing to be incredibly proud of, of this musical suggestion, is that KRNA (pronounced as Kire-ina), is, after all, a band based in nowhere else but our own city, Cagayan de Oro. Yes, an indie-pop gem hidden right exactly where we are.

KRNA was formed a little over two years ago and have been performing in CDO’s music scene since their debut performance at Musikagayan Festival in 2016. KC Salazar, lead vocalist and guitarist, wanted to explore a different sound then and has luckily found a certain connection to her bandmates- Janro Abian (drums), Rotsanjani Mojica (bass guitar), and Francis Ramos (keys).





The band members have known each other for long because each of them have been members of their own bands but sooner their unified taste and idea gave birth to the sound of KRNA. Influenced by artists such as Florence + The Machine and Feist, KRNA shines through with a dreamy, romantic tunes that are as catchy and as melancholic.

2018 the band's biggest year yet. They will be releasing their first EP album, The River Gold, in Chingkeetea — a tea house that's proudly homegrown as well. The release will kick off their national EP tour starting on August 28. The band also debuted their music video for Wide Eyes which is one of the five tracks in the album.





"And Ever"is the song that totally made us fall in love with their music. The lyrics are powerful and beautiful. The track and music video was released last November 2017 and it now has 2,224 hits on Youtube. In all honesty, it deserves more.

KRNA is set to perform live in Manila on August 31 to September 2. On September 15, the band will play live in Cebu. Their October dates are yet to be announced but they're set to perform in Iligan, Malaybalay, and Davao.

Don't miss an update. Follow their Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts. 

New Music Wednesday: KRNA


If you’re a huge indie-pop fan like us, might we recommend an artist named KRNA? Search for their single entitled “And Ever” on Spotify, press play, and you’re welcome, you’re going to lose yourself in that single moment. One thing to be incredibly proud of, of this musical suggestion, is that KRNA (pronounced as Kire-ina), is, after all, a band based in nowhere else but our own city, Cagayan de Oro. Yes, an indie-pop gem hidden right exactly where we are.

KRNA was formed a little over two years ago and have been performing in CDO’s music scene since their debut performance at Musikagayan Festival in 2016. KC Salazar, lead vocalist and guitarist, wanted to explore a different sound then and has luckily found a certain connection to her bandmates- Janro Abian (drums), Rotsanjani Mojica (bass guitar), and Francis Ramos (keys).





The band members have known each other for long because each of them have been members of their own bands but sooner their unified taste and idea gave birth to the sound of KRNA. Influenced by artists such as Florence + The Machine and Feist, KRNA shines through with a dreamy, romantic tunes that are as catchy and as melancholic.

2018 the band's biggest year yet. They will be releasing their first EP album, The River Gold, in Chingkeetea — a tea house that's proudly homegrown as well. The release will kick off their national EP tour starting on August 28. The band also debuted their music video for Wide Eyes which is one of the five tracks in the album.





"And Ever"is the song that totally made us fall in love with their music. The lyrics are powerful and beautiful. The track and music video was released last November 2017 and it now has 2,224 hits on Youtube. In all honesty, it deserves more.

KRNA is set to perform live in Manila on August 31 to September 2. On September 15, the band will play live in Cebu. Their October dates are yet to be announced but they're set to perform in Iligan, Malaybalay, and Davao.

Don't miss an update. Follow their Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts. 

The life of dancing continues to shine through up until this very day and age. The opportunity of knowing these dancers, who are gems waiting to be recognized and found, gave Vivre a chance to sit down and talk with some of those who gracefully move in the beat of their own drum. 

In an interview, we spoke with Les Paul Sañez and Melrein Viado, as they let us take a glimpse of their life as a dancer, choreographer, and simply as people who live by the art that moves them.


Have you always wanted to be a dancer/choreographer?


LES:   Honestly, I'm originally not a dancer. I was more of a singer before. I was also a public speaker. Those were the things that I did often. But I was already dancing in between because we have field demonstrations every year in Beda. We have dances in high school but we didn't have proper training. As in sayaw lang for performances. I became more interested in dancing when I met an alumnus [of San Beda] in Notre. He became our coach.

As I time passed, I've fallen deeper in love with dance. So when I was about to graduate from college, it was a struggle for me to decide which career path to pursue. I'm a Legal Management major so I need to proceed with taking up Law. But I eventually decided to pursue dance as a career.


REIN:    Since I was little, there are like "glimpses" of me being a dancer. There's this story by my Tita about how I would dance along to the beat of whatever music was playing in the disco house in front of our house before. But my love for dance started in high school. I didn't have formal training. It was only when I came here in Cagayan de Oro that I had the chance to practice in a studio setting. Here, it’s more on mentorship because the dancers dwell more on the street side. They learn dances in the streets.

After that, I really wanted to pursue dance but there's a hindrance. I'm caught between pursuing my passion and choosing a stable job. But now, I’m looking towards following my passion.



Who or what inspires you to continue your craft?

LES:  For me, I can't deny that I look up to Brian Puspos in the start. Maybe a lot of people did too. But along the way, my mentors like Eric Javier, have helped me pursue dance. They're the ones who started the fire for me to be able to do this.  

As of now, I take inspiration from a situation. I have a plan to change the dance scene here in the Philippines in a way that dance is not just a hobby, but also an honorable job. A lot of people see it only as a hobby. They don't see it as a career that can support oneself or even a family. In other countries, it's different. 

So if it's possible in other places, why not here too? That's what motivates me to keep improving my art. Every time I dance or choreograph, I always think to myself, "I wish this would propel me to somewhere on top that will make people see that it's possible. And that would make people start to believe that it's possible."


REIN:    At first, my inspiration was Brian [Puspos]. Like what Les said, maybe he was everyone's inspiration. But in general, I've looked up to Xtatic because in 2007 they won during the World Supremacy Battlegrounds in Australia. Usually, the ones representing the Philippines in dance competitions are from Luzon, but it was the first time that a group from Mindanao joined and they become champions right away. That really inspired me and made me think "Kaya pala natin coming from a small city".

I moved to Manila to learn more. I joined different groups and I met a lot of new people. Les and I met when I enrolled in his class and honestly, I consider him as my mentor.

In my family, most of my relatives are educators. They want me to be successful in a corporate job or anything as long as the passion for teaching is there. So for me, my passion for teaching is geared towards dance, which is why I want to improve myself so I can inspire and teach people through dance.




What misconceptions do you want to sort of "debunk" about your craft?

LES:  There are actually a lot! For example, dancers don't do well in school. When I was in college, people really believed that dancers like me don't perform well in school but really, they don't know anything. Maybe they have that perception because they always see us rehearsing but everybody's different. I feel like a lot of people are just over analyzing stuff. They think we don't do well in school that's why we choose to dance instead.  

Aside from that, people think dancing is easy. It's actually a sport and dancers are athletes. It requires training and a lot of time for you to perfect your craft. With that being said, dance is also entertainment. So even if you're so good at it aesthetically but you don’t have the entertainment side of it, you’re not going be an effective performer.

There's a lot of background in dance that you need to learn in order for you to become a better dancer but people think it's easy. I mean, don’t get me wrong. Everyone can dance but not everyone can pursue it as a career. You need to learn the essential stuff.

REIN:  When people know that I take this particular dance class, most of them say things like, "Ba't ka pa nag-aattend ng class eh magaling ka na (Why do you still attended classes when you're already a good dancer?)" Honestly, it's not easy and you should have the drive to learn more.

Dance is not like, okay you're gonna attend one class and then you'll become a great dancer already. There's so many things to learn so you can become not just a dancer, but also a choreographer. You have to learn the technical side and hone the creative side as well.





Throughout all the years you've spent working on your craft, what have you learned so far?

LES:    I feel like all those years of training has helped me execution and technique wise. I've learned more about what my body can do. We all have different body types so along the way, I got to understand that just because someone can do it, it doesn't mean you can do it too. Some people can do certain dance moves that maybe you can do too because you have the same body type.

Dance also teaches you to be responsible. You also have to be disciplined when it comes to studying different styles and moves. For me now, even if I'm sort-of already established, it doesn't mean that I shouldn't take classes anymore. I still take basic classes like contemporary, jazz or ballet and to think they're all basic. Honestly, these types of dances are the foundation to make you a better and effective dancer.


REIN:    For me, dance forces you to take care of yourself. You really have to live a healthy lifestyle in order to do more advanced stuff and to be the best version of yourself. So it's not just the mindset that you have to change but your body too. It's a wholistic change.





As creatives, we all have our own processes when we're creating something. For example, when you're choreographing a particular song, how do you usually do it?

LES:    Actually, there isn't a particular pattern that I follow. There are days when I like a certain song but I can't choreograph a dance for it. There are also days when I don't really plan to choreograph it but suddenly, out of nowhere, the inspiration strikes and I want to work on it.

My creative process starts with figuring out what the singer is trying to say. At the end of the day, the song has to match with the emotion that I want to portray. It's so important to connect these two different things. From there, I create a story in my head. The steps will make sense no matter how simple it is because I'm following a story.

I don't always do these things when I'm choreographing because there are times when I just want to put whatever I think of. Basically, there are two sides of the coin. Sometimes I overthink the choreography but sometimes I just allow my emotions to dictate my dance. The latter shows the raw side of the dance.

REIN:    My process is similar with Les. There's no definite timeline because sometimes there's a song that I want to choreograph a dance for last year but I just finished it now. So it depends. Now that I'm still on the exploration stage, my creative process is focused on incorporation whatever I learned from my formal training. I try to experiment as much as possible.



What’s your advice to those who are still starting out?

LES:    First, just dance and listen to music. Allow yourself to be raw. If you really want to improve, enroll yourself in a studio so you'll learn more about yourself, about what dance is all about.

The best advice I want to give is not to be like me because I want you to be you. I want you to find your own identity in dance. Dance is more of an expression of who you are and we’re not all the same. We all have different identities, likes and dislikes, especially about music.

So don’t let the internet, destroy the curious child in you. Whatever music you want, whether you like Kpop or dubstep, if that's the kind of music that sparks your interest, why not try it and be the first person to do it here. That's so much better than always trying to ride with the waves and be like other people.


REIN:   Don’t be afraid to make a fool out of yourself! Sometimes people, especially when they're still starting out, they're stuck in their comfort zone and they're afraid. This is so true especially if you’re from a small city like Cagayan de Oro where people's bonds are so close that whenever you try to do something, you're gonna think "Kung gagawin ko 'to pag-uusapan ako ng mga tao."

So don’t be afraid to make a fool out of yourself as long you know what you're doing and you have a definite goal. Just start because you won’t be the version of yourself you want to be if you don’t try.


***

LES PAUL SAÑEZ is a dance instructor at Groove Central Dance Studio. He's a member of School Of Goodlock. He's also a dance coach of Quezon City Science High School and UST Terpsichorian Circle Medicine.


MELREIN VIADO hails from Cagayan de Oro city. He is currently an instructor at the ACTS Dance and Arts Academy, dance coach of celebrity kids for Mavs Talents Management, and a member of the 2017 VIBE PH Champions, TPM. As a dance coach, he has already taught in studios in Cdo, Metro Manila, and Kuwait. 

Vivre (/Vi/) is a homegrown lifestyle website based in Cagayan de Oro, PH. If you'd like to contribute, don't hesitate to shoot an email to vivrethesite@gmail.com.

The Modern Movement


The life of dancing continues to shine through up until this very day and age. The opportunity of knowing these dancers, who are gems waiting to be recognized and found, gave Vivre a chance to sit down and talk with some of those who gracefully move in the beat of their own drum. 

In an interview, we spoke with Les Paul Sañez and Melrein Viado, as they let us take a glimpse of their life as a dancer, choreographer, and simply as people who live by the art that moves them.


Have you always wanted to be a dancer/choreographer?


LES:   Honestly, I'm originally not a dancer. I was more of a singer before. I was also a public speaker. Those were the things that I did often. But I was already dancing in between because we have field demonstrations every year in Beda. We have dances in high school but we didn't have proper training. As in sayaw lang for performances. I became more interested in dancing when I met an alumnus [of San Beda] in Notre. He became our coach.

As I time passed, I've fallen deeper in love with dance. So when I was about to graduate from college, it was a struggle for me to decide which career path to pursue. I'm a Legal Management major so I need to proceed with taking up Law. But I eventually decided to pursue dance as a career.


REIN:    Since I was little, there are like "glimpses" of me being a dancer. There's this story by my Tita about how I would dance along to the beat of whatever music was playing in the disco house in front of our house before. But my love for dance started in high school. I didn't have formal training. It was only when I came here in Cagayan de Oro that I had the chance to practice in a studio setting. Here, it’s more on mentorship because the dancers dwell more on the street side. They learn dances in the streets.

After that, I really wanted to pursue dance but there's a hindrance. I'm caught between pursuing my passion and choosing a stable job. But now, I’m looking towards following my passion.



Who or what inspires you to continue your craft?

LES:  For me, I can't deny that I look up to Brian Puspos in the start. Maybe a lot of people did too. But along the way, my mentors like Eric Javier, have helped me pursue dance. They're the ones who started the fire for me to be able to do this.  

As of now, I take inspiration from a situation. I have a plan to change the dance scene here in the Philippines in a way that dance is not just a hobby, but also an honorable job. A lot of people see it only as a hobby. They don't see it as a career that can support oneself or even a family. In other countries, it's different. 

So if it's possible in other places, why not here too? That's what motivates me to keep improving my art. Every time I dance or choreograph, I always think to myself, "I wish this would propel me to somewhere on top that will make people see that it's possible. And that would make people start to believe that it's possible."


REIN:    At first, my inspiration was Brian [Puspos]. Like what Les said, maybe he was everyone's inspiration. But in general, I've looked up to Xtatic because in 2007 they won during the World Supremacy Battlegrounds in Australia. Usually, the ones representing the Philippines in dance competitions are from Luzon, but it was the first time that a group from Mindanao joined and they become champions right away. That really inspired me and made me think "Kaya pala natin coming from a small city".

I moved to Manila to learn more. I joined different groups and I met a lot of new people. Les and I met when I enrolled in his class and honestly, I consider him as my mentor.

In my family, most of my relatives are educators. They want me to be successful in a corporate job or anything as long as the passion for teaching is there. So for me, my passion for teaching is geared towards dance, which is why I want to improve myself so I can inspire and teach people through dance.




What misconceptions do you want to sort of "debunk" about your craft?

LES:  There are actually a lot! For example, dancers don't do well in school. When I was in college, people really believed that dancers like me don't perform well in school but really, they don't know anything. Maybe they have that perception because they always see us rehearsing but everybody's different. I feel like a lot of people are just over analyzing stuff. They think we don't do well in school that's why we choose to dance instead.  

Aside from that, people think dancing is easy. It's actually a sport and dancers are athletes. It requires training and a lot of time for you to perfect your craft. With that being said, dance is also entertainment. So even if you're so good at it aesthetically but you don’t have the entertainment side of it, you’re not going be an effective performer.

There's a lot of background in dance that you need to learn in order for you to become a better dancer but people think it's easy. I mean, don’t get me wrong. Everyone can dance but not everyone can pursue it as a career. You need to learn the essential stuff.

REIN:  When people know that I take this particular dance class, most of them say things like, "Ba't ka pa nag-aattend ng class eh magaling ka na (Why do you still attended classes when you're already a good dancer?)" Honestly, it's not easy and you should have the drive to learn more.

Dance is not like, okay you're gonna attend one class and then you'll become a great dancer already. There's so many things to learn so you can become not just a dancer, but also a choreographer. You have to learn the technical side and hone the creative side as well.





Throughout all the years you've spent working on your craft, what have you learned so far?

LES:    I feel like all those years of training has helped me execution and technique wise. I've learned more about what my body can do. We all have different body types so along the way, I got to understand that just because someone can do it, it doesn't mean you can do it too. Some people can do certain dance moves that maybe you can do too because you have the same body type.

Dance also teaches you to be responsible. You also have to be disciplined when it comes to studying different styles and moves. For me now, even if I'm sort-of already established, it doesn't mean that I shouldn't take classes anymore. I still take basic classes like contemporary, jazz or ballet and to think they're all basic. Honestly, these types of dances are the foundation to make you a better and effective dancer.


REIN:    For me, dance forces you to take care of yourself. You really have to live a healthy lifestyle in order to do more advanced stuff and to be the best version of yourself. So it's not just the mindset that you have to change but your body too. It's a wholistic change.





As creatives, we all have our own processes when we're creating something. For example, when you're choreographing a particular song, how do you usually do it?

LES:    Actually, there isn't a particular pattern that I follow. There are days when I like a certain song but I can't choreograph a dance for it. There are also days when I don't really plan to choreograph it but suddenly, out of nowhere, the inspiration strikes and I want to work on it.

My creative process starts with figuring out what the singer is trying to say. At the end of the day, the song has to match with the emotion that I want to portray. It's so important to connect these two different things. From there, I create a story in my head. The steps will make sense no matter how simple it is because I'm following a story.

I don't always do these things when I'm choreographing because there are times when I just want to put whatever I think of. Basically, there are two sides of the coin. Sometimes I overthink the choreography but sometimes I just allow my emotions to dictate my dance. The latter shows the raw side of the dance.

REIN:    My process is similar with Les. There's no definite timeline because sometimes there's a song that I want to choreograph a dance for last year but I just finished it now. So it depends. Now that I'm still on the exploration stage, my creative process is focused on incorporation whatever I learned from my formal training. I try to experiment as much as possible.



What’s your advice to those who are still starting out?

LES:    First, just dance and listen to music. Allow yourself to be raw. If you really want to improve, enroll yourself in a studio so you'll learn more about yourself, about what dance is all about.

The best advice I want to give is not to be like me because I want you to be you. I want you to find your own identity in dance. Dance is more of an expression of who you are and we’re not all the same. We all have different identities, likes and dislikes, especially about music.

So don’t let the internet, destroy the curious child in you. Whatever music you want, whether you like Kpop or dubstep, if that's the kind of music that sparks your interest, why not try it and be the first person to do it here. That's so much better than always trying to ride with the waves and be like other people.


REIN:   Don’t be afraid to make a fool out of yourself! Sometimes people, especially when they're still starting out, they're stuck in their comfort zone and they're afraid. This is so true especially if you’re from a small city like Cagayan de Oro where people's bonds are so close that whenever you try to do something, you're gonna think "Kung gagawin ko 'to pag-uusapan ako ng mga tao."

So don’t be afraid to make a fool out of yourself as long you know what you're doing and you have a definite goal. Just start because you won’t be the version of yourself you want to be if you don’t try.


***

LES PAUL SAÑEZ is a dance instructor at Groove Central Dance Studio. He's a member of School Of Goodlock. He's also a dance coach of Quezon City Science High School and UST Terpsichorian Circle Medicine.


MELREIN VIADO hails from Cagayan de Oro city. He is currently an instructor at the ACTS Dance and Arts Academy, dance coach of celebrity kids for Mavs Talents Management, and a member of the 2017 VIBE PH Champions, TPM. As a dance coach, he has already taught in studios in Cdo, Metro Manila, and Kuwait. 

Vivre (/Vi/) is a homegrown lifestyle website based in Cagayan de Oro, PH. If you'd like to contribute, don't hesitate to shoot an email to vivrethesite@gmail.com.

A few days ago, I finally let go of my longest creative project ever —  my lifestyle and travel blog, The Wandering Dreamer. It came a bit of a shock for some of my friends who have seen my progress through the years to the point that they sent me messages asking if I was okay. Some of the friends I made online were surprised too.

During the end of 2017, I was already feeling jaded by the pressure of keeping such a project. I didn't understand the direction of where I wanted it to go. I was doing more things that I thought was what my readers wanted, but I actually didn't like or enjoy.

I let my hunger for high website statistics to dictate what I do. I missed a lot of moments because I needed to document it or I needed to take note of it so I can have something to write about on my blog. I had to endure several unpleasant travel experiences because "This could make a good post for the blog." 

The move from Blogspot to Squarespace made it even worse because I was already paying for a monthly website subscription. I have to work on my blog even harder so it can maintain the monthly expenses. Hence, the Facebook Ads, the shameless plugs, and all the other desperate attempts to gather more website traffic.

It was all too much.

I've tried so hard to save it, but the entire idea of keeping a lifestyle and travel blog didn't connect with my soul anymore. There's got to be something else I can work on or I can be aside from being a blogger.

So The Wandering Dreamer had to die in order for me to start working on something different and maybe a lot better.


DEATH CAN BE A GOOD THING


A week ago, I watched a Youtube video of Donald Glover's 2018 Grammys interview and he was asked about the end of Childish Gambino (his music alter-ego). He said "I think endings are good because it forces things to get better" and I highly resonated with that.

As creatives, sometimes we think that our work can never have an end because it's always "in progress." There's always something that we can improve on. But if it doesn't sit well with you anymore or you feel like it has already run its course, it's absolutely okay for it to die. How else can you start something new without any ending?

"Creative Deaths" can mean a lot of things, not just an absolute end of one project like what I did with mine. It may mean the end of a phase of a bigger and longer undertaking.

----

I never fully understood this until recently: everything always ends in one way or another. If my blog didn't close at this point, it's simply postponing the inevitable. I'm glad that I've made this decision before I nosedived for the worse.

So what's next? I don't know yet. But the "not knowing" part is what makes this whole creative journey exciting.


Pearl Aton is a photographer & writer from Cagayan de Oro, PH. She travels as much as she can and she used to write about it on her blog. But now that it's gone, she's excited for what's to come. Maybe in her next article, she will change this bio.

Why Creative Deaths Are Good


A few days ago, I finally let go of my longest creative project ever —  my lifestyle and travel blog, The Wandering Dreamer. It came a bit of a shock for some of my friends who have seen my progress through the years to the point that they sent me messages asking if I was okay. Some of the friends I made online were surprised too.

During the end of 2017, I was already feeling jaded by the pressure of keeping such a project. I didn't understand the direction of where I wanted it to go. I was doing more things that I thought was what my readers wanted, but I actually didn't like or enjoy.

I let my hunger for high website statistics to dictate what I do. I missed a lot of moments because I needed to document it or I needed to take note of it so I can have something to write about on my blog. I had to endure several unpleasant travel experiences because "This could make a good post for the blog." 

The move from Blogspot to Squarespace made it even worse because I was already paying for a monthly website subscription. I have to work on my blog even harder so it can maintain the monthly expenses. Hence, the Facebook Ads, the shameless plugs, and all the other desperate attempts to gather more website traffic.

It was all too much.

I've tried so hard to save it, but the entire idea of keeping a lifestyle and travel blog didn't connect with my soul anymore. There's got to be something else I can work on or I can be aside from being a blogger.

So The Wandering Dreamer had to die in order for me to start working on something different and maybe a lot better.


DEATH CAN BE A GOOD THING


A week ago, I watched a Youtube video of Donald Glover's 2018 Grammys interview and he was asked about the end of Childish Gambino (his music alter-ego). He said "I think endings are good because it forces things to get better" and I highly resonated with that.

As creatives, sometimes we think that our work can never have an end because it's always "in progress." There's always something that we can improve on. But if it doesn't sit well with you anymore or you feel like it has already run its course, it's absolutely okay for it to die. How else can you start something new without any ending?

"Creative Deaths" can mean a lot of things, not just an absolute end of one project like what I did with mine. It may mean the end of a phase of a bigger and longer undertaking.

----

I never fully understood this until recently: everything always ends in one way or another. If my blog didn't close at this point, it's simply postponing the inevitable. I'm glad that I've made this decision before I nosedived for the worse.

So what's next? I don't know yet. But the "not knowing" part is what makes this whole creative journey exciting.


Pearl Aton is a photographer & writer from Cagayan de Oro, PH. She travels as much as she can and she used to write about it on her blog. But now that it's gone, she's excited for what's to come. Maybe in her next article, she will change this bio.

In the midst of the hustle and bustle of Cagayan de Oro, comes another hiding spot for caffeine-lovers. Spotted just right along South Bank, Yacapin, fronting City Central School, you’ll find a coffee shop so small, that it’s almost hidden behind its glass doors. This is Cafe Pilar.

Its interiors — a touch of minimal and Scandinavian design, is perfect for caffeine-induced afternoons one can relax and spend time on peacefully. Apart from serving coffee, you can also dig into their carefully crafted set of pastries. The cafe is perfect for lunch meetings or dates with your significant other because they also offer delectable meals.



Our stay in Cafe Pilar was short but sweet. If you're a big fan of matcha-flavored drinks, their version of the Matcha Frappe is a must try especially when the heat is unbearable. Their cappuccino doesn't disappoint too. We can see ourselves spending a lot of time in this cafe, brainstorming for article ideas.

If you need a new place to catch up with your friends or family, Cafe Pilar is a great place to get a cup of coffee and exchange long conversations in. They're located in Stronghold Insurance Building, Yacapin-Velez Sts., Cagayan de Oro City.

****

Vivre (/Vi/) is a homegrown lifestyle website based in Cagayan de Oro, PH. If you'd like to contribute, don't hesitate to shoot an email to vivrethesite@gmail.com.

Film photos by Pearl Aton.

Hole In The Wall Cafe Series - Cafe Pilar


In the midst of the hustle and bustle of Cagayan de Oro, comes another hiding spot for caffeine-lovers. Spotted just right along South Bank, Yacapin, fronting City Central School, you’ll find a coffee shop so small, that it’s almost hidden behind its glass doors. This is Cafe Pilar.

Its interiors — a touch of minimal and Scandinavian design, is perfect for caffeine-induced afternoons one can relax and spend time on peacefully. Apart from serving coffee, you can also dig into their carefully crafted set of pastries. The cafe is perfect for lunch meetings or dates with your significant other because they also offer delectable meals.



Our stay in Cafe Pilar was short but sweet. If you're a big fan of matcha-flavored drinks, their version of the Matcha Frappe is a must try especially when the heat is unbearable. Their cappuccino doesn't disappoint too. We can see ourselves spending a lot of time in this cafe, brainstorming for article ideas.

If you need a new place to catch up with your friends or family, Cafe Pilar is a great place to get a cup of coffee and exchange long conversations in. They're located in Stronghold Insurance Building, Yacapin-Velez Sts., Cagayan de Oro City.

****

Vivre (/Vi/) is a homegrown lifestyle website based in Cagayan de Oro, PH. If you'd like to contribute, don't hesitate to shoot an email to vivrethesite@gmail.com.

Film photos by Pearl Aton.

"Are you a tourist or a traveler?" This question has bugged me since the day I started to go from one place to another frequently. This was two years ago. Honestly, the question has affected the way I've traveled.

Whenever I come back from a trip and people would ask me where I went, what places I've visited, and what I did while I was there, there's always at least one person who'll tell me, "Oh that's so touristy!" or "Ha? Sayang lang imong time didto. You should've gone to this place..." 

This made me create my itineraries carefully. I tried to include as many off-the-beaten-path places as I can and less "touristy" ones. You know what, I always end up wishing I visited more of the iconic spots or wishing I spent more time in a certain tourist spot.

Not that I didn't enjoy seeing the less popular places, I simply felt like something's missing. And I try to cheer myself up by saying that I'll go that place when I visit again, which hardly ever happens.

When I was planning my 12-day trip to three countries in South East Asia, I remembered the question and I shrugged it off completely. Why do I have to let a label dictate how I want to enjoy my trip? It's so silly! So what if I want to see and take photos of the Marina Bay Sands or the Petronas Towers and want to experience more than the usual too? So what if I want to check off all the must-visit places (even if they're tourist traps lol) on my list? It doesn't mean that I don't want to experience living like a local too.

Is there even any difference between being a tourist and a traveler?  


I did a quick Google search of articles about Tourists vs Travelers and I've stumbled upon absolutely ridiculous articles such as this one from Bored Panda, or this one from Huffington Post. I'm not sure if these are satirical articles. I hope they are.

Further scrolling had led me to this insightful blog post by The Backpacker's Paradox. I absolutely loved this line from the post:

"...the whole ‘traveller vs tourist” argument is bullshit. What makes someone a better traveler than someone else? Travel means different things to different people.

If you only have a limited number of days to spend in a certain place and you want to hit up all the must-dos on your list, then, by all means, go do it! If you're traveling long-term and you want to experience living with a local family or a tribe, go for it! I honestly believe now that there isn't any right or wrong way to travel. Your own experience is what matters the most.

This TED Talk by Cassie de Pecol, an incredible solo female traveler who broke a world record by traveling to 196 countries, is an absolute eyeopener. Here's the video and I hope you get some incredible insights:



"We all have our own way of traveling and discovering a culture and it doesn't matter what you see or where you go, what matters is your own experience while you're there. Some people think that only spending a week or an hour in a country doesn't allow you to see it, but if there's one thing I know to be true it's that just one brief experience can shape your whole life."

So the next time you plan you list the spots you want to go for your trip, forget about the labels! Travel however, whenever, and with whomever you want to. It's your trip, not the people who are making you feel bad for wanting to see the Merlion Statue for the first time. Walang basagan ng trip 😆.


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Pearl Aton is a digital nomad from Cagayan de Oro, PH. She travels as much as she can. Pearl blogs over at  The Wandering Dreamer.    

Tourist or Traveler: What's Up With The Labels?


"Are you a tourist or a traveler?" This question has bugged me since the day I started to go from one place to another frequently. This was two years ago. Honestly, the question has affected the way I've traveled.

Whenever I come back from a trip and people would ask me where I went, what places I've visited, and what I did while I was there, there's always at least one person who'll tell me, "Oh that's so touristy!" or "Ha? Sayang lang imong time didto. You should've gone to this place..." 

This made me create my itineraries carefully. I tried to include as many off-the-beaten-path places as I can and less "touristy" ones. You know what, I always end up wishing I visited more of the iconic spots or wishing I spent more time in a certain tourist spot.

Not that I didn't enjoy seeing the less popular places, I simply felt like something's missing. And I try to cheer myself up by saying that I'll go that place when I visit again, which hardly ever happens.

When I was planning my 12-day trip to three countries in South East Asia, I remembered the question and I shrugged it off completely. Why do I have to let a label dictate how I want to enjoy my trip? It's so silly! So what if I want to see and take photos of the Marina Bay Sands or the Petronas Towers and want to experience more than the usual too? So what if I want to check off all the must-visit places (even if they're tourist traps lol) on my list? It doesn't mean that I don't want to experience living like a local too.

Is there even any difference between being a tourist and a traveler?  


I did a quick Google search of articles about Tourists vs Travelers and I've stumbled upon absolutely ridiculous articles such as this one from Bored Panda, or this one from Huffington Post. I'm not sure if these are satirical articles. I hope they are.

Further scrolling had led me to this insightful blog post by The Backpacker's Paradox. I absolutely loved this line from the post:

"...the whole ‘traveller vs tourist” argument is bullshit. What makes someone a better traveler than someone else? Travel means different things to different people.

If you only have a limited number of days to spend in a certain place and you want to hit up all the must-dos on your list, then, by all means, go do it! If you're traveling long-term and you want to experience living with a local family or a tribe, go for it! I honestly believe now that there isn't any right or wrong way to travel. Your own experience is what matters the most.

This TED Talk by Cassie de Pecol, an incredible solo female traveler who broke a world record by traveling to 196 countries, is an absolute eyeopener. Here's the video and I hope you get some incredible insights:



"We all have our own way of traveling and discovering a culture and it doesn't matter what you see or where you go, what matters is your own experience while you're there. Some people think that only spending a week or an hour in a country doesn't allow you to see it, but if there's one thing I know to be true it's that just one brief experience can shape your whole life."

So the next time you plan you list the spots you want to go for your trip, forget about the labels! Travel however, whenever, and with whomever you want to. It's your trip, not the people who are making you feel bad for wanting to see the Merlion Statue for the first time. Walang basagan ng trip 😆.


****

Pearl Aton is a digital nomad from Cagayan de Oro, PH. She travels as much as she can. Pearl blogs over at  The Wandering Dreamer.    

Coffee in a quaint cafe with tons of inspiring decor? That sounds like the perfect place to chill for us. We've heard about Bowerbird Coffee several weeks after it opened but never had the chance to visit the place, until recently. Locating the shop was a bit of a challenge since we missed to spot the newly opened Lane 101 in Masterson's Avenue. Eventually, we saw the huge shop sign painted on a large block of wood and the brightly lit fairy lights. It honestly looked like it was calling us from a distance. 

When we entered the small shop, we were greeted with the sweet smell of freshly brewed coffee — something we'll never ever get enough of. It's hard not to swoon at all the beautiful knick-knacks on display. There were wooden shelves designed like a swing on one wall and beautiful sketches, postcards and flowers hanging on the other. Packages of imported coffee, cute teacups, and magazines sat on the wooden shelves. Looking around the shop was a visual treat.

We definitely don't mind spending a rainy afternoon in their shop, enjoying a cup of coffee, scribbling away on our journals, and drowning out all of the noise outside with heart-melting music playing through our earphones. It's such a cozy and inspiring place.




Che Roa, one of the owners, explained that a Bowerbird is a kind of bird in Australia. She said that they're basically hoarders because they gather and keep all sorts of things inside their nest. She also shared that some people mistake their name as "Powerbird", making it sound like a networking company instead of a coffee shop.

Bowerbird Coffee serves soul-awakening cups of joe, using 100% Arabica beans from different local roasters such as Kapeng Lumad, Kahayag Coffee Roaster, Maramag Coffee, and many more. These roasters source their beans from the mountains of Miarayon, Libona, Maramag, and others.

Che shared that she also collects single origin or specialty coffee beans from India, Guatemala, and Honduras, to name a few. "It's a hobby of mine when I do manual brewing or make espresso. Sometimes I share it with some of my friends." Aside from serving coffee and sumptuous pastries in their shop, they also offer catering services for events such as weddings and birthdays.

What's next for Bowerbird Coffee? Expansion to serve more great cups of coffee. For sure, we will be the first ones on the lookout when they move to a bigger place or branch out soon. We'll be there!

Bowerbird Coffee: Creativity And Passion In A Cup is located in Lane 101 Building F, Stall # 7, Masterson's Ave., Upper CarmenCagayan de Oro City.



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Vivre (/Vi/) is a homegrown lifestyle website based in Cagayan de Oro, PH. If you'd like to contribute, don't hesitate to shoot an email to vivrethesite@gmail.com.

Hole In The Wall Cafe Series - Bowerbird Coffee PH

Cagayan de Oro, Misamis Oriental, Philippines


Coffee in a quaint cafe with tons of inspiring decor? That sounds like the perfect place to chill for us. We've heard about Bowerbird Coffee several weeks after it opened but never had the chance to visit the place, until recently. Locating the shop was a bit of a challenge since we missed to spot the newly opened Lane 101 in Masterson's Avenue. Eventually, we saw the huge shop sign painted on a large block of wood and the brightly lit fairy lights. It honestly looked like it was calling us from a distance. 

When we entered the small shop, we were greeted with the sweet smell of freshly brewed coffee — something we'll never ever get enough of. It's hard not to swoon at all the beautiful knick-knacks on display. There were wooden shelves designed like a swing on one wall and beautiful sketches, postcards and flowers hanging on the other. Packages of imported coffee, cute teacups, and magazines sat on the wooden shelves. Looking around the shop was a visual treat.

We definitely don't mind spending a rainy afternoon in their shop, enjoying a cup of coffee, scribbling away on our journals, and drowning out all of the noise outside with heart-melting music playing through our earphones. It's such a cozy and inspiring place.




Che Roa, one of the owners, explained that a Bowerbird is a kind of bird in Australia. She said that they're basically hoarders because they gather and keep all sorts of things inside their nest. She also shared that some people mistake their name as "Powerbird", making it sound like a networking company instead of a coffee shop.

Bowerbird Coffee serves soul-awakening cups of joe, using 100% Arabica beans from different local roasters such as Kapeng Lumad, Kahayag Coffee Roaster, Maramag Coffee, and many more. These roasters source their beans from the mountains of Miarayon, Libona, Maramag, and others.

Che shared that she also collects single origin or specialty coffee beans from India, Guatemala, and Honduras, to name a few. "It's a hobby of mine when I do manual brewing or make espresso. Sometimes I share it with some of my friends." Aside from serving coffee and sumptuous pastries in their shop, they also offer catering services for events such as weddings and birthdays.

What's next for Bowerbird Coffee? Expansion to serve more great cups of coffee. For sure, we will be the first ones on the lookout when they move to a bigger place or branch out soon. We'll be there!

Bowerbird Coffee: Creativity And Passion In A Cup is located in Lane 101 Building F, Stall # 7, Masterson's Ave., Upper CarmenCagayan de Oro City.



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Vivre (/Vi/) is a homegrown lifestyle website based in Cagayan de Oro, PH. If you'd like to contribute, don't hesitate to shoot an email to vivrethesite@gmail.com.

Upon entering the gates of Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort, you know you’re in for some fun. For its grand opening and holiday festival, Vivre got to witness first-hand on what the first themed waterpark in Mindanao has to offer. Created to take fun and leisure to a whole new level, a myriad of high-rising and adrenaline-induced waterslides are everywhere in sight, thus the shrill sound of enthusiasm from the guests. 

Taking in the form of an island with pirate ships, Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort was made to look like a film coming out to life; think Pirates of The Carribean? Its atmosphere, are cohesively and delicately planned out, that even its merchandise store called The Pirates' Market and café called Captain Oliver's Cafe gave off the same kind of feeling you get when you walk around from one location to the next. Really, it was an entirely new world in there!




Several activities welcomed guests to finally commence its opening to the public. A giant stage by the wave pool housed performances by DJ Kyle and DJ Kitty, the singing mermaids, and a show-stopping production number by the Seven Seas Pirates in one of the waterpark’s ships. Other than those, a fireworks show entertained everyone by evening and a tree-lighting ceremony was held near the fountain. Guests were then ushered into the clubhouse for a lavish dinner. Some of the VIP guests were Hon. Yevgeny Emano, governor of the 2nd District of Misamis Oriental; Hon. Maxie Rodriguez, vice-governor of the 2nd District of Misamis Oriental; Mayor Jennie Uy of Villanueva, Misamis Oriental; Mayor Maximo Seno of Opol, Misamis Oriental; Mr. Mario Mamon, founder, and CEO of Enchanted Kingdom; and Ms. Marie Unchuan, Department of Tourism Region X Director.  

Behind all these was Engr. Elpidio Paras’ vision, who spoke to the crowd of the waterpark’s humble beginnings. “Like any other project, Seven Seas began as a simple dream.” With his modest and unassuming demeanor, he simply reminisced of the time when his wife hoped for a place where their grandkids could play and eat around by a nipa hut in a fishpond. “True enough about 6 years ago the opportunity came and we were able to acquire this property [and] we’re very happy that we found the right connections.” Where Seven Seas presently stands was previously a vast fishpond they once desired to attain.








He also shared that it was vital to create a backstory of Seven Seas rooted from the rich history of the Philippines, back to a time when the Dutch wanted to take the country into its wing from the Spaniards in the early 1600s.  Aside from that, Seven Seas represents his seven children whom he dearly loves and takes pride in, as well as the symbolic number seven. Definitely, the entire Paras family was as invested as he was in this dream project.

The waterpark not only personified a new face of fun but boosted Mindanao’s tourism step by step and generated jobs for the people of Barra, Opol  an opportunity greater than the adventure and thrill that it gives. Over 200 staff are currently working in the park and most of them are residents of Opol.

The next time you're thinking of going on a brand new adventure, put  Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort on your list. Grab your family and friends, pack your board shorts and rashguards, and head to Barra, Opol, Misamis Oriental! 



For the complete list of ticket fees, cabana rates, and park rules, visit their Facebook page. We hope to SEA you there soon!

Fun Under The Sun At Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort Holiday Festival


Upon entering the gates of Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort, you know you’re in for some fun. For its grand opening and holiday festival, Vivre got to witness first-hand on what the first themed waterpark in Mindanao has to offer. Created to take fun and leisure to a whole new level, a myriad of high-rising and adrenaline-induced waterslides are everywhere in sight, thus the shrill sound of enthusiasm from the guests. 

Taking in the form of an island with pirate ships, Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort was made to look like a film coming out to life; think Pirates of The Carribean? Its atmosphere, are cohesively and delicately planned out, that even its merchandise store called The Pirates' Market and café called Captain Oliver's Cafe gave off the same kind of feeling you get when you walk around from one location to the next. Really, it was an entirely new world in there!




Several activities welcomed guests to finally commence its opening to the public. A giant stage by the wave pool housed performances by DJ Kyle and DJ Kitty, the singing mermaids, and a show-stopping production number by the Seven Seas Pirates in one of the waterpark’s ships. Other than those, a fireworks show entertained everyone by evening and a tree-lighting ceremony was held near the fountain. Guests were then ushered into the clubhouse for a lavish dinner. Some of the VIP guests were Hon. Yevgeny Emano, governor of the 2nd District of Misamis Oriental; Hon. Maxie Rodriguez, vice-governor of the 2nd District of Misamis Oriental; Mayor Jennie Uy of Villanueva, Misamis Oriental; Mayor Maximo Seno of Opol, Misamis Oriental; Mr. Mario Mamon, founder, and CEO of Enchanted Kingdom; and Ms. Marie Unchuan, Department of Tourism Region X Director.  

Behind all these was Engr. Elpidio Paras’ vision, who spoke to the crowd of the waterpark’s humble beginnings. “Like any other project, Seven Seas began as a simple dream.” With his modest and unassuming demeanor, he simply reminisced of the time when his wife hoped for a place where their grandkids could play and eat around by a nipa hut in a fishpond. “True enough about 6 years ago the opportunity came and we were able to acquire this property [and] we’re very happy that we found the right connections.” Where Seven Seas presently stands was previously a vast fishpond they once desired to attain.








He also shared that it was vital to create a backstory of Seven Seas rooted from the rich history of the Philippines, back to a time when the Dutch wanted to take the country into its wing from the Spaniards in the early 1600s.  Aside from that, Seven Seas represents his seven children whom he dearly loves and takes pride in, as well as the symbolic number seven. Definitely, the entire Paras family was as invested as he was in this dream project.

The waterpark not only personified a new face of fun but boosted Mindanao’s tourism step by step and generated jobs for the people of Barra, Opol  an opportunity greater than the adventure and thrill that it gives. Over 200 staff are currently working in the park and most of them are residents of Opol.

The next time you're thinking of going on a brand new adventure, put  Seven Seas Waterpark & Resort on your list. Grab your family and friends, pack your board shorts and rashguards, and head to Barra, Opol, Misamis Oriental! 



For the complete list of ticket fees, cabana rates, and park rules, visit their Facebook page. We hope to SEA you there soon!

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